Things to See & Do in San Juan County, Utah During the Government Shutdown

Entrance Station at the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park During the Government Shutdown. (photo: Britt Hornsby)

Unfortunately, our National Parks and Monuments are currently closed due to the government shutdown. Our toll-free information line has been ringing off the hook for the past day and a half with calls from visitors who are about to head our way (or are already here) asking what they can see and do now that they can’t visit the parks. LUCKILY if your travel plans are bringing you to Utah’s Canyon Country, there’s still PLENTY to do!  Here’s a list of some of our favorite places and things to do in San Juan County that have not been affected by the shutdown and are still OPEN to the public.  In no particular order…

1.  Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

Our Shadows at Sunset in Monument Valley

Shadows at Sunset in Monument Valley

Goulding's Tour in Monument Valley

Goulding’s Tour in Monument Valley

2. Edge of the Cedars State Park & Museum

Ancestral Puebloan Site at Edge of the Cedars

Ancestral Puebloan Site at Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum

Visible Storage at Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum

Visible Storage at Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum

3. Goosenecks State Park

Goosenecks State Park

San Juan River- Goosenecks State Park

4. Bluff Fort

Sunset at the Bluff Fort

Sunset at the Bluff Fort

Bluff Fort Co-Op Store

Bluff Fort Co-Op Store

Butt Cabin

Butt Cabin at the Bluff Fort

5.  One of Our Countless Petroglyph Panels

Petroglyph Panel in Indian Creek - Hwy 211

Petroglyph Panel in Indian Creek – Hwy 211

Newspaper Rock

Newspaper Rock Petroglyph Panel- Hwy 211

My Husband at the Wolfman Panel

Wolfman Petroglyph Panel Near Bluff

Petroglyphs in Indian Creek

Petroglyphs in Indian Creek- Hwy 211

6.  Rafting on the San Juan River with Wild Rivers Adventures

San Juan River Trip with Wild Rivers Expeditions

San Juan River Trip with Wild Rivers Expeditions

7.  Wilson Arch

Sunset at Wilson Arch (Photo: Oculus Media)

Sunset at Wilson Arch (Photo: Oculus Media)

8.  Ruins on Cedar Mesa

House on Fire Ruin - Mule Canyon

House on Fire Ruin – Mule Canyon

Moon House Ruin- McLoyd Canyon

Moon House Ruin- McLoyd Canyon

Fallen Roof Ruin- Road Canyon- Cedar Mesa, UT

Fallen Roof Ruin- Road Canyon

9.  Four Corners Monument

Four Corners Monument Marker

Four Corners Monument Marker

10.  One of Our AMAZING Overlooks

Muley Point

Muley Point

Needles Overlook

Needles Overlook

Looking Down On Indian Creek From Along Hart Point Road

Looking Down On Indian Creek From Along Hart Point Road

Sunset over the Six Shooter Peaks

Sunset over the Six Shooter Peaks- Hart Point Road

11.  Fall Colors in the Abajo Mountains

Fall Colors in the Abajos

Fall Colors in the Abajos

12.  Blue Mountain Artisan Gallery & Monticello Artisan Co-Op

Blue Mountain Artisan's Gallery- Blanding, UT

Blue Mountain Artisan’s Gallery- Blanding, UT

Monticello Artisan Co-op, Monticello, UT

Monticello Artisan Co-op, Monticello, UT

13.  Hiking in the La Sals

Mt Peale & Mt Tukuhnikivaz

Mt Peale & Mt Tukuhnikivaz

On the Way Back Down - Mt Peale - La Sal Mountains

Mt Peale – La Sal Mountains

Fanning Away the Mosquitoes - Mt Peale - La Sal Mountains

Mt Peale – La Sal Mountains

Mt. Tukuhnikivatz

Mt. Tukuhnikivatz

14.  ATVing on One of Our Many Trails

San Juan ATV Safari - Arch Canyon

ATVing in Arch Canyon

San Juan ATV Safari Night Ride

ATVing in the Abajos- Wagon Wheel Trail

15.  Golfing at the Hideout Golf Course in Monticello

Hideout Golf Club - Monticello, UT

Hideout Golf Club – Monticello, UT

There’s so much to see in our area, I could have just kept going with this list!  If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ve probably already read our entries on most of these places.  If you aren’t a regular reader and you see something that interests you, please search for it in the search bar on the right hand side of the page- it will bring up the individual blog entry and give you more pictures, information, and directions.

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

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7 Responses to Things to See & Do in San Juan County, Utah During the Government Shutdown

  1. Randy says:

    I called the NPS and they told me that all BLM lands are also closed, this would include Mule Canyon and Cedar Mesa, right?

    • Allison says:

      Randy-
      Thank you for your comment. I was told by our local BLM that areas where you self-register/pay (such as House on Fire Ruin) are still open to the public during the shutdown.
      Allison

  2. westerner54 says:

    Thanks, this is so helpful. Planning to head to Cedar Mesa this week, but was wondering if we’d be able to hike on any of the trails – glad to hear we can!

  3. westerner54 says:

    Actually, am now wondering about whether we’ll be able to camp on Cedar Mesa – for example, off of Snow Flat Road. Any way you could check on that for us? Can’t contact anyone in the BLM from here. Thanks very much!

    • Allison says:

      Thank you for your comment (and your call!) I thought I’d just go ahead and answer your question on here in case anyone else is wondering the same thing. What we’ve been told by our local BLM office is that Cedar Mesa is still open for hiking and camping. The only BLM campground in the area that we’ve been told is closed is Sand Island. I will keep updating if we hear of any other closures.

  4. Lynne Wolfe says:

    What about heading down into Slickhorn and Grand Gulch, where you would normally need a BLM permit?

    • Allison says:

      The most recent information I’ve received is that permits for hiking in Grand Gulch are being treated as if it was off-season- you will just need to self register at Kane Gulch Ranger Station. Please keep in mind though, that since BLM employees are still furloughed, there won’t be anyone patrolling the trails. (So nobody will be there to help you if something happens!)

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