National Park Week 2015

Needles Hikers- Canyonlands National Park  photo: Jacob W. Frank

Needles Hikers- Canyonlands National Park photo: Jacob W. Frank

National Park Week is coming up on April 18th-26th and for the opening weekend, April 18th & 19th, the National Park Service is offering free entrance to all National Parks & Monuments nationwide!

Utah’s Canyon Country is home to one National Park (Canyonlands) and three National Monuments (Hovenweep, Natural Bridges, and Rainbow Bridge), and is also within about an hour of 2 more National Parks! (Arches and Mesa Verde)  What better place to base yourself out of to take advantage of free entrance days?!

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

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Canyonlands with Kids!

Building Cairns on the Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Building Cairns on the Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

One of the most asked question at the Sportsmen’s and Travel Shows that my office did this year on the Wasatch Front was definitely about hiking with kids and asking for suggestions on kid-friendly hikes in our area- specifically in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park.  This is a regular question that we get asked, but the number of people who asked this year was off the charts!  At one point I had 3 families in a row come up to my booth and ask that exact same question!

As luck would have it, the timing was perfect because at one of those shows I also met Kathy Dalton, the founder of a blog and called, Go Adventure Mom, and an online magazine called, Go Adventure Magazine.  I was really excited when she asked if I’d like to write an article for her magazine, and based on all the questions about hiking with kids I was being asked, I knew that that was exactly what I needed to write about!  The article I wrote for Go Adventure Magazine covered hiking and things to do with kids near Monticello, Blanding, and Bluff and you can read the full article HERE, but I wanted to just share a part of it on my blog as well…

Although my husband and I have always considered ourselves to be avid hikers, I have to admit- I HATED hiking as a kid. I’m not sure if it’s because we started hiking suddenly when I was about 10, or if it was because my Dad, a Forest Service employee, insisted that camping was to be done in the wilderness, NOT in campgrounds with amenities such as vault toilets, running water, and firepits, but I do know that I absolutely hated it. To this day, I still swear that my older sister (the one on the left in the photo above) broke her toe on purpose the day before we were scheduled to go on a backpacking trip and I spent years trying to get her to admit it, but to this day she still insists it was an accident. Likely story.

I'm the one on the right... do I look like I was having fun?  Not so much...

I’m the one on the right… do I look like I was having fun?  (1983)

Fast forward to college- I suddenly realized that I got to pick where I was going to hike, and I got to pick the length of the hike, and I loved it! Not long after my husband and I started dating, we took a 6 week road trip through the west, logging 100+ miles of hiking to places like Havasu Falls in the Grand Canyon, Zion, Death Valley, Sequoia/King’s Canyon, Yosemite, Redwoods, Crater Lake, and many other places. Our hiking style has changed quite a bit since having our son 2 ½ years ago- we used to do quite a bit of overnight backpacking, which I’m sure we’ll get into again once our son is a little older, but for now we’re happy to take it a little slower, and do shorter hikes that we hope will help our son develop the same love of hiking that we share! Lucky for us we live in Utah’s Canyon Country, with endless hiking, exploring, & adventure opportunities in every direction! Here are a few of my favorite family-friendly hikes in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park:

Enjoying the View!  Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Enjoying the View! Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring
At only .6 miles, this short loop trail is a great hike for kids. The trail first takes you past an old cowboy camp nestled in an alcove with tables, dishes, a cookstove, and many other items still in place. As you continue down the trail you’ll come to Cave Spring, which is one of the few year-round water sources in the area. If you look closely, a smoke blackened ceiling and pictographs confirm that this area was used by the Ancestral Puebloan Indians long before the cowboys came along.

Trailhead of Cave Spring- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Trailhead of Cave Spring- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Old Cowboy Camp- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Old Cowboy Camp- Cave Spring Hike- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring Hike- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

After passing Cave Spring, two ladders take you up onto the slickrock above and provide you with amazing panoramic views of the Needles Rock formations, North and South Six-Shooter Peaks in Indian Creek, and the Abajo and La Sal Mountains. This hike provides a great opportunity for kids to learn first-hand about the history of Canyonlands. It’s long enough to get to see lots of cool stuff, but short enough that they won’t get bored or feel like they’re being punished! (As a kid who hated hiking, this is very important if you’re hoping to take them out again in the future!)

Climbing one of the two ladders- Cave Spring- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Climbing one of the two ladders on the Cave Spring Trail-Needles District of Canyonlands

Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Cave Spring Trail- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

Family Photo

Family Photo

Pothole Point
Pothole Point is another great hike for kids in the Needles District of Canyonlands. Again, at only .6 miles, there’s no time for kids to get bored on this hike, especially if you go after an early spring or late summer rain when the potholes are full of water and creatures such as Fairy Shrimp, Beetle Larvae, Tadpoles, Snails, and Tadpole Shrimp. Since water never lasts long around here, the potholes provide a great opportunity for learning about the life cycle and adaptations of these desert dwelling organisms.

It hadn't rained recently, so the potholes were empty when we visited!- Pothole Point- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

It hadn’t rained recently, so the potholes were empty when we visited.

But there were still cool rocks to hid behind!- Pothole Point- Needles District of Canyonlands National Park

But there were still cool rocks to hid behind!

For children ages 5 and up, there’s also the Junior Ranger Program that they can complete to earn a special Junior Ranger Badge! Just pick up a booklet at the Visitor Center when you arrive!
While you’re in the area:                                                                                                             Be sure to check out ‘Finders Keepers’ at the Hideout Golf Club in Monticello. Every year from Memorial Day through Labor Day, locally made Cedar Mesa Pottery is hidden along the paths on the golf course and if you find it, you get to keep it! My husband and I have gone out looking for years and have yet to find anything, but the golf course staff always assures me that it IS out there! (549 S Main St, Monticello, UT Admission: No charge to walk the paths)

Chasing Bunnies, er, looking for pottery at the Hideout Golf Club

Chasing bunnies, er, looking for pottery at the Hideout Golf Club

 

Distance from Canyonlands Needles District Visitor Center to lodging in San Juan County, Utah:

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Canyonlands, Canyonlands National Park, Hiking, National Parks, National Parks & Monuments, Things to do for FREE!, Things to do with kids, Travel, Utah | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Geocaching in San Juan County, UT!

My first cache!

My first cache!

Up until last fall, I had never gone geocaching.  I’m not sure why, it’s always seemed like something that I would really enjoy.  In fact, my husband and I actually found a cache once when we were still living in Missoula and were looking for the ‘Golden Egg’ that was hidden somewhere within city limits right before Easter.  The local newspaper would give a hint each day, and whoever found the egg won like $1,000 or something.  (I’ve googled it and can’t find ANYTHING about it, so they must not do it anymore)

I think the reason was probably that I was under the misconception that I needed a GPS to go geocaching.  But when we started working with the Utah Office of Tourism (Visit Utah)  last year as one of the pilot counties for their new state-wide geocaching program, I found out that there’s an app (of course there is) that you can download from geocaching.com.  I downloaded it while sitting at my desk at work, and was surprised to see how many caches there were in Monticello!  A couple of them were within a few blocks of my house and I walk by them almost daily!

Before I went out to find locations for our five San Juan County caches, I decided to try my hand at locating my first geocache!  I have to say, all it took was hearing that first ding on my phone telling me I was close and I was hooked!  My first cache is pictured above- it was tiny and I am still surprised I found it.  But when I did and I was signing the log, I was shocked to see how many recent signatures there were!  It was the end of November and I think there were at least 2-3 signatures within the previous week!

Stashing A Geocache at Goosenecks State Park- San Juan County- UT

Planting A Geocache at Goosenecks State Park- San Juan County- UT

San Juan County is a huge county- 7,933 sq miles- so going out to place 5 caches is not necessarily a one day project.  I decided to focus on the locations we were looking at in the south end of the county first; Goosenecks State Park, the Bluff Fort, and the Butler Wash Ruins on Hwy. 95.  Although I was rushing and trying to plant the caches as fast as I could, I really enjoyed getting to visit some places in the county that I don’t get to very often.  I mean, who doesn’t love Goosenecks?!  And I get paid to go there!  Doesn’t get much better than that!

San Juan County Schwag!

Visit Utah & San Juan County Schwag!

Planting Caches

Planting Caches

My Geocaching Partner!

My Geocaching Partner!

Newspaper Rock- San Juan County, UT

Newspaper Rock- San Juan County, UT

As much as I enjoyed planting the caches, I wasn’t thrilled that it took me two days to place them.  But part of the thought process behind this program was trying to get people to visit as much of each county as possible, so I guess that’s how it goes when you live in one of the largest counties in the country! (For those of you who love random trivia as much as I do, according to Wikipedia, San Juan is the 24th largest county in the US!)  At least I got to see some beautiful scenery while I was out there!  Plus, I got to take my favorite little geocaching partner with me to plant a couple of them, so I can’t complain about that!

San Juan County Patch

San Juan County Patch

One way to try to encourage people who might not already be geocachers to participate in the program is by bribing them providing an incentive!  In this case, an awesome San Juan County, UT patch that was designed specifically for this program!  All you have to do is find at least three of our five San Juan County caches, write down the codes that you will find inside, and take them to either the Blanding Visitor Center or Goulding’s Lodge in Monument Valley to receive your patch!

Since there are hundreds of geocaches in San Juan County, I thought I might help you out a little and give the direct links to our five San Juan County Geocaches that are included in Visit Utah’s State Geocaching Program:

Currently, aside from San Juan, 7 other Utah counties have their caches planted and have patches available. (Box Elder, Daggett, Uintah, Utah, Carbon, Emery, and Iron)  Here is a link to all of Visit Utah’s caches on geocaching.com.

We’re also offering a chance at winning some extra Utah’s Canyon Country goodies by posting to our Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter after finding one of our caches.  Details are inside each cache!

Happy Geocaching!

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Blanding, Bluff, Bluff Fort, Geocaching, Giveaways, Monticello, Monument Valley, Ruins, State Parks, Things to do for FREE!, Things to do with kids, Travel, Utah, Visitor Centers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming Event: 17th Annual Bluff International Balloon Festival

2015 Bluff Balloon Festival

One of my favorite annual events in San Juan County is coming up this weekend- the Bluff International Balloon Festival!  In its 17th year, the balloon festival now has 28 hot air balloons with pilots and crews, making their way to Bluff to take part in a weekend of flying the skies over Bluff and Valley of the Gods.

Bluff Balloon Festival- San Juan County, UT

Bluff Balloon Festival- San Juan County, UT

Bluff Balloon Festival- San Juan County, UT

Bluff Balloon Festival- San Juan County, UT

In addition to the events that take place in the skies above Bluff, there are also a lot of events for spectators to enjoy on the ground; A Navajo Taco dinner with traditional Navajo dancing by Bluff Elementary School students, Arts Fair, Chili & Ice Cream Social, and a Balloon Glow-In at dusk.

Video credit: The Salt Lake Tribune

Earlier this year, KUED, Channel 7 in Salt Lake City (PBS) featured the Bluff International Balloon Festival on their, ‘Utah Bucket List 2′.  If you’ve ever attended, I’m sure you’ll agree!  It’s a truly unique experience in a breathtaking location!

Four years ago I was lucky enough to get to go up in one of the balloons, and I’ll never forget it- it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever experienced!  You can read my blog entry about my experience HERE.  While this is mostly a spectator event, there is ALWAYS the chance that if you show up early enough, you may be able to volunteer as a crew member and have the opportunity to go up in one of the balloons!  But whether you make it up in a balloon or not, attending the balloon festival is an experience like no other and I promise, you’ll be glad you came!

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Bluff, Events, Things to do for FREE!, Things to do with kids, Travel, Utah | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming Event: Winter Solstice Paleo-Bison Burning in Bluff

Paleo Bison Buring- photo: Bluff Arts Festival

Paleo Bison in the works for the 2014 Winter Solstice Celebration- photo: Bluff Arts Festival

Two years ago the town of Bluff hosted a unique event on the Winter Solstice- a Mammoth Effigy Burning.  Two local artists, Joe Pachak and JR Lancaster, with the help of some Bluff residents, built a 16 foot mammoth out of willow and cottonwood in an open lot in the center of town.  The mammoth was built with the intention to not only celebrate the Winter Solstice, but also to bring awareness to the area’s history and to the mammoth petroglyph along the San Juan River near town.

2012 Mammoth Effigy- Bluff, UT- photo: Wayne Ranney

2012 Mammoth Effigy- Bluff, UT- photo: Wayne Ranney

Mammoth Effigy- 2012- Bluff, UT- photo:Wayne Ranney

Mammoth Effigy- 2012- Bluff, UT- photo: Wayne Ranney- All In A Days Karma

Although the mammoth was definitely a work of art that could have attracted many people had it been left standing, it was built with the purpose of being burned on the Winter Solstice, and that’s just what happened.  It turned into a pretty large event- a few hundred people showed up to watch flaming spears be shot at the mammoth to set it on fire.

Video credits: Larry Ruiz  copyright 2013 Cloudy Ridge Productions

For the Winter Solstice this year Joe Pachak and JR Lancaster have been working on a Paleo-Bison Effigy.  When I signed up for the Willow Weaving Workshop at the Bluff Arts Festival, I saw that ‘Build a Bison Sculpture’ was on the schedule of events, and was running all day long throughout the length of the Arts Festival.  I saw them working on it as we drove by, but unfortunately we didn’t have time to stop and take a closer look.  But, the fact that it was in the works in mid-October shows that it takes a LONG time to complete something like this!  I missed the first one, but I’m definitely planning to attend this year!  The Bison Burning has expanded and there are a few other events planned in Bluff that day prior to the Bison Burning itself.  Here’s the tentative schedule for the Winter Solstice (December 21st, 2014) Bison Burning:

  • Free photo workshop given by JR Lancaster, ‘How to Get the Most (With Your Camera) Out of a Flaming Megafauna’.  The only workshop like it in the world! (1:00pm)
  • Exhibition of bison paintings by Brent Spink at Cloudwatcher Gallery followed by music and poetry.
  • Lighted bike ride through Bluff (sunset)
  • Poi Fire Spinner performance
  • The ignition with flaming atlatl darts followed by dancing and singing (Solstice Shuffle) (7:00pm)

*I’d like to give a big THANK YOU to Wayne Ranney for permission to use the beautiful photos from his blog, All In A Days Karma!

Distance from Bluff to lodging in San Juan County, Utah:

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Bluff, Events, Rock Art, San Juan River, Things to do for FREE!, Things to do with kids, Travel, Utah | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County’s Version of Goblin Valley

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

You know how every so often you’ll suddenly start hearing lots of people talk about something that you had never previously heard of?  Well that happened to me recently with Recapture Pocket- an area near Bluff that is kind of a miniature Goblin Valley with lots of hoodoos and cool rock formations.  After hearing about it twice within about a month after NEVER having heard a thing about it before, I took it as a sign and knew that I had to go!

Although it’s threatening to snow as I sit here writing this,  last weekend was still unseasonably warm for the beginning of November so my husband, son, and I headed down to Bluff with a road atlas and a rough map my coworker drew for me on a post-it.  Turned out, this wasn’t quite enough, but luckily I realized that I still had bars on my phone all the way out there and was able to find a blog that gave really detailed directions and we found it really easily.

Before going, all I had seen of Recapture Pocket was a picture on a friend’s cell phone and a few images when I googled it.  Based on the limited information I found on the internet, it’s obviously a place that doesn’t get that much traffic.  This made me feel a little better for having not heard of it sooner!

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Playing 'At the Beach'- Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Playing ‘At the Beach’- Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

While following the directions we had found online, we spotted an area that looked cool from the road, so we decided to check it out before continuing to the main attraction.  There was a lot of wide open sandstone and patches of sand which my son LOVED.  He immediately plopped down and declared that he was ‘at the beach’.  It took us a while to finally drag him away from the sand, but once he saw that he could run around the rock formations, I think the sand was forgotten!

I remember the first time I went to Goblin Valley- I just wanted to run around and hide behind the rock formations and jump out and scare people!  (No- I wasn’t a little kid when I went- it was only 5 years ago!)  Well, it’s the same feeling at Recapture Pocket, but the really cool thing there is that there’s no crowd of people- you have it all to yourself.  There is nothing better than being at a really cool place like this and having it all to yourself to explore and discover- it just makes the experience that much better!  I think we’ve become kind of spoiled living here, since having a trail, a ruin, a whole monument, to yourself is kind of the norm. (Yes, my husband and I really had a whole monument to ourselves once!  Read about our first visit to Hovenweep HERE!)

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

Recapture Pocket- San Juan County, UT

The first place we stopped was really cool, but the main site was even better!  To drive right to the main site I think you probably need at least a semi-high clearance vehicle.  We have a newer Subaru Outback with about 8.5 inches of clearance and we were fine, but if you don’t want to chance it, it would be less than a 1 mile hike in. (Directions at the end of post)

We probably spent a couple hours at Recapture Pocket just walking around and looking at all the crazy rock formations and trying to get our son to pose for pictures.  (Not very successfully!)  We found a bunch of plastic Easter eggs while we were there- maybe some Bluff families take their kids out there to hide eggs?  However they got there, my son had a great time playing Easter Egg Hunt!

I think we could have spent a lot more time exploring, but lunch and nap time were calling, so we had to cut it short.  I think it would be a great place to camp, especially with a large group or with a family.  I think kids would love to just be able to run around and play around all the hoodoos and crazy formations and little canyons.  We had a great time, and will definitely be taking people who come to visit us to Recapture Pocket in the future!

Directions:

From Bluff: At the junction of Hwy 191 & Hwy 162, turn east and drive until you reach the junction of Hwy 163 & Hwy 216.  Turn north onto Hwy 216 and follow it to a sharp, 90 degree bend in the road.  At the bend, turn right onto CR217.  You will come to a couple Ys in the road- stay right on CR217 until you see a left hand (north) turn onto CR249.  After turning north on CR249, continue on this road until you come to another Y.  Turn left and follow the road into a dry wash (This is where you may want to park if you’re worried about your vehicle’s clearance.  If there is water flowing in the wash, DO NOT attempt to cross it!) After crossing the wash, continue down the road for approximately 1 mile until you see Recapture Pocket on your left.

Distance from Bluff to lodging in San Juan County, Utah:

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Bluff, Camping, Geology, Hiking, Things to do for FREE!, Things to do with kids, Travel, Utah | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Bluff Arts Festival- Willow Weaving Workshop

Bluff Arts Festival- Willow Weaving Workshop

Bluff Arts Festival- Willow Weaving Workshop

A couple weeks ago I finally got to do something that I’ve been wanting to do ever since I moved here… take one of the workshops at the Bluff Arts Festival!  I’ve been interested in taking one of the workshops for years now, but just never made it down there for one reason or another.  This year my Dad decided to come visit in mid-October, and when I realized that his visit would coincide with the Bluff Arts Festival, I looked on their website to see if they still had openings in any of the workshops that I thought he might be interested in.  When I saw the Willow Weaving workshop I knew that he’d want to do it, and sure enough, when I told him about it he said to sign him up!

The workshops vary from year to year.  In addition to Willow Weaving, some of the workshops offered this year included; Cooking Native Foods, Hand Built Clay, Native Drumming, Rock Art Drawing Workshop, Drawing with Acrylics, Plein Air Painting, Hike to the Wolfman Rock Art Panel, and many others.  They also have evening events including; storytelling, a film festival, and a Gala at the Community Center with the Desert Mountain Dancers and Tab Murphy- an Academy Award nominated screenwriter.  By the time I signed us up, many of the workshops were already full, but luckily the one I wanted the most- Willow Weaving- still had a couple spots open, however it DID fill up completely by the day of the workshop.

Woven panels at Rusticks Gallery- Bluff, UT

Woven panels at Rusticks Gallery- Bluff, UT

The workshop was held at Rusticks Gallery which is the home of Kyle Bauman who is also known as the ‘Willow Weaver’.  If you live in the area (and you pay attention to these kinds of things!) you’re probably familiar with his work.  There are many businesses and homes in Bluff that have his decorative panels in their gardens & yards, and in the festival brochure it says that his work can be found in 30 states and Canada, so it looks like it extends far beyond this area!

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

The workshop began with Kyle introducing himself and showing us an example of what we’d be making.  He had already constructed the frames for us, so he just showed us the first step and where the materials were, and turned us loose.  There were 3 different types of wood available for us to use; willow, tamarisk, and cottonwood saplings, plus you could strip them to make a lighter color if you wanted, so although we were following a fairly set pattern, there was a lot of variation on how everyone’s panels looked when we were finished.

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

My Dad at the Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

My Dad Hard at Work at the Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Work in Progress- Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Everyone spread out and found a spot to work- about half the group used the tables inside, and the other half of us opted to work outside.  My dad and I set up along the fence and got to work- I have to say it was a little harder than I thought it would be!  The frames were pretty stiff, so as you got more and more pieces in place, it got pretty hard to weave new pieces in.  But it was definitely a really fun and relaxing way to spend a beautiful fall morning in Bluff!

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Willow Weaving Workshop- Bluff Arts Festival 2014

Since everyone was so spread out and at different places with their panels, Kyle would just go around and when he could see that people were ready for the next step, he’d show them what to do next.  It seemed to work well, and three hours later my dad and I had our finished projects!  Well, mostly finished anyway.  Our ‘homework’ assignment was to find or create something to put in the center of our panels.  I haven’t done it yet, but I’m thinking I might make a little mosaic for mine and use all the broken Japanese dishes I have that I can’t bear to throw away!

I’m so glad I finally made it down to take part in the Bluff Arts Festival this year.  I’ll definitely be signing up for another workshop next year, the only problem will be trying to rule it down to just one!

Distance from Bluff to lodging in San Juan County, Utah:

For more information or to request travel brochures, please call Utah’s Canyon Country at: 800-574-4386

Or e-mail us at: info@utahscanyoncountry.com

Posted in Bluff, Events, Travel, Utah | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment